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Don’t Call Me Resilient!

For many years, those who have experienced major trauma have been called resilient… as if it were a compliment.

Coming from a very traumatic background myself, I cringe every time I hear that word. Call me a Warrior, call me Wonder Woman, call me a powerful Goddess… but never call me resilient! Resilience feels like a trivial buzzword from the uninformed.

Many who have experienced trauma have most definitely ‘therapist shopped’, trying to find a therapist that not only understands trauma… and its usual companions – PTSD and anxiety, but who is empathic and committed to helping them out of the darkness. Being hyper-vigilant and ‘on alert’ is built into our system as a survival mechanism, so we know in that first session if it’s going to help. When we don’t feel the intuition, connection or empathy, then it’s onto the next therapist… until just having to tell our story one more time can be retraumatising and we give up!

As a trauma therapist and trainer myself, so very many that have graced my clinic with their presence, were not even aware they had PTSD; they just thought they were irreversibly broken. Some of the symptoms may be perplexing, and perhaps steered them in the wrong direction for help, thinking each symptom was another nasty clue that we are broken, such as: • Chronic Anxiety • Irrational Fear • Hyper-Vigilance • Hopelessness • Sweats for No Reason • Insomnia
• Nightmares/Terrors • Self-Defeating Criticism • Self-Harm • Easily Startled • Social Phobia • An Innate Feeling of Being Unsafe • Unable To Answer the Phone/Text/Email • Extreme Procrastination • Depression (well why wouldn’t you be depressed with all these symptoms!). It wasn’t until I was looking for a trauma therapist for one of my children who experienced a severe trauma, that the stark truth hit me… they are as scarce as hen’s teeth.

So, as a trauma therapist myself, it is an honour to assist a fellow human being through their trauma, so I created my own trauma program – the DeTrauma Technique™, and I have trained over 300 therapists in this technique with amazing results. Most traumas are desensitised in one session, with one or two follow-up sessions to reframe the trauma response. C-PTSD (chronic long-term trauma – Complex PTSD) may take between three to six sessions.

The good news is… you are NOT broken as a whole…only the part of you that experienced that trauma is broken, and that part can be healed and brought back to normality in the right hands. We have many parts that make up the whole… we have parts that experience happiness, parts that experience anger, parts that experience frustration, parts that have experienced and are storing the trauma (watch the children’s movie – Inside Out to get a sense of this). Each part has its own unique personality, function, agenda and purpose. We start with the DeTrauma Technique™ to desensitise the emotional charge from the trauma. Then we allow that part that experienced the trauma to have a voice, feel safe, feel supported, loved and nurtured and allow it to be removed from the hyper-vigilant lead role in the conscious, with the knowing that a stronger, more mature part will take that lead role, then healing can happen very rapidly… almost instantaneously.

If you can relate to anything mentioned here, then please go to our website and look under ‘HTA Recommended Therapists’ and choose one of our trauma-informed therapists to set you free.

Kaz Field Anderson is a Trainer in Transpersonal Psychotherapy, Clinical Hypnotherapy, Trauma & Clinical Resource Therapy at Hypnotherapy Training Australia.

www.hypnotherapytraining.net.au

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